Seed Swapsies 2022

Alreet m' paper packets,


The deranged skin headed Bronson (played by Tom Hardy) has taken a prison guard hostage in his cell. A telephone is passed through the door's hatch. The governor on the other end asks "What do you want?". Bronson replies 'What have you got?'

Bronson

As promised... here is some of what I have :

  • Amaranthus Caudatus Red (Love Lies Bleeding) (grown as ornamental but is edible)
  • Cucumber 'Crystal Lemon'
  • Dill 'Mammoth'
  • Dwarf French Beans 
  • Chilli Pepper 'Cayenne'
  • Pumpkin 'Blue Prince'
  • Runner Bean Scarlet Emperor
  • Tomatoes (a whole range, including cherries, beefsteaks etc)

 

There may be many more added to this list, but I am checking the viability of some using this handy chart, courtesy of Chicago Botanic Garden -

The RHS Veg Planner is useful for formulating a seed to harvest plan.

This year I want to get better at growing salad crops successionally, to ensure a constant supply. An old colleague, Ridders, recommended a great book years ago - 'Square Foot Gardening' , for maximizing crops in small spaces.


Here's a lovely film I watch each January to get me in the mood for growing:  

'My Urban Garden' by Polly Bennell

Although made in 1984, the gardener Carol Bowlby seems to be way ahead of her time, in terms of 'no dig' raised beds, recycling, successional growing, organic ideas etc. Plus the soundtrack is fabulously kitsch 70s flute and glockenspiel. Together with Carol's lilting Canadian accent, it is very relaxing to listen to. I used to watch this on the National Film Board of Canada website, but it has since appeared on YouTube.

 

Hope you are doing well. 

Just a short post today and not as many pretty pictures. 

 I am in the midst of revising for my final RHS exams!!!

Plus I'd very much like to catch up on some of your blogs too, once I've done my homework.

Lulu xXx


***If you are up for swapsies, email 'longmizzle (insert at) gmail.com' ***

* Sorry, it will be tricky sending out of the UK - postal costs and import seed regulations etc*

*** Please say hello in the comments section below first, so I know you're not a nutter ...and so I can look out for your email (no need to give out your email address on here) ***

 

Thank you for visiting!

Most recent posts can be found here -

https://longmizzle.blogspot.com/

 

 




Comments

  1. happy homework!
    :-D
    although i´m tempted i will not put you and me into the hazzle & cost of sending a package from the UK to the continent......
    but i´m already in the middle of planning this years plantings - know a good nursery now. had their seeds last year and were impressed. and its "demeter" certified.
    much love! xxxx

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Beate, bless ya :) I've just added a sub note for UK only - as Ol' Glass Eye Mumrah also pointed out some countries have very strict custom regulations for seeds. I get given loads of seeds so have them spilling out of my fridge, and ears! Great that you have found a good nursery. Happy plant planning, sounds more fun than my revision... which, whoops, I'd better get on with :0 Lulu xXx

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    2. think you have a tempting selection there mrs seedhead, tigerella sounds boisterous! i wont do swapsies as nothing here worth swapping. i bought some salad leaves seeds and plan to grow in trays on my garden table, it worked well last year. good luck for the rhs exam. betty

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    3. I like the look of Tigerella too Betty! Don't worry about the swapsies, If you do fancy any, I can just send some - have them coming out of m' ears! In fact, the list is growing! Bravo on the salad xXx

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    4. nothing for me although that is very generous an offer... I have some tomatoes and lettuce seeds to play with this year and that is probably all i can manage unless we get an allotment but methinks we will be on that waiting list a fair bit longer :) seeing other bloggers doing their gardening stuff is very enjoyable :)

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  2. What a lovely selection of seeds!
    I fully admit to having somewhat neglected our little patch lately, so I'll have my work cut out come Spring time - or at least slightly better and drier whether - to get it all shipshape again.
    I'm keeping my fingers crossed for your exam! xxx

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Ann :) The exam's not for three weeks, but I am behind on my revision schedule :0 Monsieur's not too happy about the seeds taking up half the fridge! I am sure you'll get your lovely patch all ship shape again once the weather warms/ dries up xXx

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  3. Oh gosh its that time of year again.......I rather ignored it last year and didn't end up sowing a single seed and completely neglected the garden. I still had a regular supply of kale and salad stuff self seeded from previous years ;) I therefore don't expect a single one of my seeds to be viable for this year! it would not be fair for me to enter a swop when I am not able to swop. I am however grateful for the link to the video which I am heading off to watch. Good luck with your exams x

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    1. The joys of self-seeding, that's amazing! Mother nature doesn't really need us does she!?! If you fancy anything, just let me know. To be honest, I have always have more seeds than I can sow in any one year... and when I do sow them, I run out of soil patches in the garden! I'm using the old packets for micro-green experiments. Enjoy the 70s flute xXx

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  4. How exciting! We got a sowing guide free in the post this week and keep meaning to get the seeds out and see what we've got. I'll let you know if I have anything swap worthy!
    Wishing you lots of luck with the exams ! xxx

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    1. Hello Vix, the guide sounds good! It's always fun having a good rummage in the seed stash isn't it :) I have A LOT of seeds (a good neighbour is always posting them through my letter box), so if you do fancy any, please shout me. The list is bound to grow! Thank you for the good luck. I've done enough revision for today, it's spritzer o'clock ;) .... xXx

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  5. So many lovely seeds. Good luck with all the planting. All the best with the studying/revising for your RHS exams- I'm sure you'll do well.
    P.S. Shipping has become more complicated with corona, hasn't it? One more thing to make our life complicated. I imagine it is really hard for those people with small businesses that rely on shipping, like people with Etsy shops and stuff.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Ivana! :) :) :) Tea and biscuits will help with the revision ;) A lot of small businesses seem to have stopped sending out of the UK / EU. It's been a long time since I've sent eBay items to far flung corners of the world though, so I am unaware of the precise complications xXx

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    2. Tea and biscuits help with everything. :)

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  6. Dear Lulu
    I have many seeds already and am cutting down on growing due to my lack of space. However, I am sure you'll find some happy homes for yours. Good luck with the revision and exams.
    I went through my roses like a dose of salts this afternoon pruning them, after I watched a guide on pruning from David Austin. I was surprised they said not to worry about the 'outward facing bud' etc., but to go for half the overall height for established shrub roses and then take out the diseased, damaged , dead bits and crossing bits. I am looking on this as an experiment and it will be interesting to see how they do this year.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    Replies
    1. I feel your pain Ellie! Too many seeds, not enough patch. Well done on the rose pruning. Funny you should mention the outward bud thing, as I've heard a couple of people now say 'just get 'em lobbed off' , or words to that effect. I would be inclined to believe the David Austin expertise! I am looking forward to your summer roses already :) xXx

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  7. Damn lulu why did you have to do this the week I go home!! I have just got a bolt load off me mam to take back to japan as I got a wooden greenhouse off the boys. Mine are weird though and are in Japanese lol!! but they speak the same language of love don’t they.
    I’m talking some houseplant cuttings in my books home just don’t tell customs lol. Love and huggs allie

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    1. Oh how naughty you are Allie with the stealth book! Next you'll have secret compartments in your boots :0 What day are you heading back to Japan? I wonder if I could get a quick package out before you go? Exciting news about the greenhouse, how kind of your boys. And yes, the plants don't mind which language, they just hear the tone ;) xXx

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    2. p.s. It would be really interesting to know if/ what home edible crops are grown in Tokyo. I was discussing Daikon radish with my Japanese neighbour. You may be familiar with it? It is a long, white radish, not seen for sale in the UK. I have an old packet of seeds - if they are still viable, I hope to grow some for her in a pot x

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  8. Oh I must take a look through me own seed box and see if anything is within it to tickle your fancy m'dear. Best of luck with your homework, what be it you are studying?

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    1. Hello John, thank you for offering to look through the Orc's workshop :) I've been working my way through the RHS Level 2 Theory Certificates via the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (online for me). Started at the end of 2019, not knowing what was coming in 2020! Thought I'd have them done and dusted by the end that year, but lockdown homeschooling / home working juggling put the brakes on that :0 xXx

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  9. Hi Lulu, Hope the revision is going well! I look forward to a productive year at Long Mizzle. As much as I would love to be in a position to take part in seed swapsies, our garden is just too darn shady to successfully grow much in the way of produce. Our sunniest bit is actually not garden, but the side of our house. We had a good crop of tomatoes from there a couple of years ago so if I can grow it in a pot, I might stand a chance! xxx

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    1. Thanks Claire :) Can't wait to get these last two exams out the way, then I can get properly stuck in with the garden. I completely understand about the light levels. My first house had a north facing back yard, that would only see a bit of sun in the month of August. I was crazy thinking I could grow pumpkins in buckets and tomatoes up the wall. Sounds like you've had more success with your sunny side of the house xXx

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  10. HI Lulu,
    Thanks for a great post. I need some garden inspiration so I will be checking out that film.
    Have a lovely week,
    Jane X

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jane :) The film is very dated in terms of the fashions and music BUT completely up to date with gardening techniques. I never saw a garden that looked quite like that in the 80s, and certainly hadn't heard of 'no dig' or organic gardening until the late 90s! xXx

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  11. Best of luck with your exams Lulu! My poor little back yard doesn't get any sunlight until spring so it's a bit dormant in the winter but I have got some daffs coming up. Hope you and yours are OK xx

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    1. Hello Sue, lovely to hear from you. I am treating myself to a cheeky blogging session between revising ;) I've spotted the daffs are out in the hedgerows. Hope you and Lainy are doing well. Lulu xXx

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  12. I'd love a small pinch of the Chioggia beetroot if you can spare some.

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    1. Of course Cherie! I'll add it to the stash xXx

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